Minnesota Small Business Relief Grants

Baudette Disaster

This program will make available $10,000 grants to Minnesotan owned and operated businesses that can demonstrate financial hardship as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak. A total of $60.3 million is available for grant awards which will be selected through a computer-generated, randomized selection process.

Awards will be disbursed and administered by qualified local and regionally based nonprofit organizations. Grant funds received by individual businesses shall be used for working capital to support payroll expenses, rent, mortgage payments, utility bills, and other similar expenses that occur or have occurred since March 1, 2020, in the regular course of business. These are grants and no repayment will be required.

Applications for the Small Business Relief Grant Program are now open and will be accepted until 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, July 2. Please click on the application tab below to apply.

Click here for more details.

Baudette Hotel Named Best of AmericInn

AmericInn by Wyndham Baudette

BAUDETTE, MN (June 12, 2020) – The AmericInn by Wyndham Baudette at 1179 Main St W. today announced it has been awarded the annual “Best of AmericInn”, which recognizes the brand’s top-performing hotels and their staffs.

In celebration of the achievement, Jeremy Nelson, District Director of Discover Lodging Management, accepted the award from AmericInn and Wyndham Hotels & Resorts leadership.

“Receiving this honor is a testament to the incredible work of our hotel teams in delivering top-notch hospitality day in and day out,” said Nelson. “Winning the hearts and loyalty of guests is all about maintaining a quality hotel and cultivating a staff that’s passionate about the details;
we’ve succeeded on both fronts, and we’ll continue striving to set the bar even higher for what it means to be a ‘Best of AmericInn.”

To be eligible for the award, hotels must demonstrate strong quality scores, outstanding guest reviews and an unwavering commitment to the Wyndham Rewards loyalty program and its members.

The AmericInn by Wyndham is a 63-room hotel and offers complimentary breakfast, pool, fitness center, and updated rooms. Rooms feature refrigerators and microwaves, upgraded bedding and updated furnishings.

Equipment for COVID-19, non-critical businesses

Background

Governor Tim Walz’s Executive Order 20-33 requires each business in operation during the peacetime emergency establish a COVID-19 Preparedness Plan. This plan is designed to help a business keep their employees safe by taking steps to control exposure to COVID-19 by limiting contact, social distancing and assuring they have enough equipment prior to starting up, among other options. Communicating this plan and providing training to workers is key to implementing the plan.

COVID-19 is spread mainly through close contact from person to person in respiratory droplets from someone who is infected. People who are infected often – but not always – have symptoms of illness. People without symptoms are able to spread the virus. COVID-19 is also spread from contact with a contaminated surface or object.

Hierarchy of controls
Occupational safety and health professionals use a framework called the “hierarchy of controls” to select ways of controlling workplace hazards. The best way to control a hazard is to remove it from the workplace, rather than relying on workers to reduce their exposure. During a COVID-19 outbreak, when it may not be possible to eliminate the hazard, the most effective protection measures are:

1. engineering controls;
2. administrative controls;
3. safe work practices (a type of administrative control); and
4. personal protective equipment (PPE).
Types of controls

In most cases, a combination of control measures will be necessary to protect workers. The following is a description of each control listed from most effective to least effective.

1. Engineering controls involve isolating employees from work-related hazards. Engineering controls include isolation rooms and other physical barriers, such as clear plastic “sneeze guards” that can limit most workers’ exposures.

2. Administrative controls require action by the worker or the business. Typically, these require changes in work policy or procedures to reduce or minimize exposure to a hazard. Administrative controls include requiring sick workers to stay home, encouraging teleworking when possible and staggering work shifts.

3. Safe work practices are types of administrative controls that include procedures for safe and proper work used to reduce the duration, frequency or intensity of the exposure to a hazard. Safe work practices can include the following.

a. Use social-distancing measures, such as requiring all workers to stay at least six feet away from customers and coworkers.

b. Limit the number of workers entering the business. Based on the square footage and configuration of the worksite, set a specific number of workers allowed in that can maintain a distance of at least six feet from each other.

c. Designate workers to monitor and facilitate social-distancing and hygiene practices.

4. Personal protective equipment (PPE) includes gloves, goggles, face shields, face masks and respiratory protections. Businesses shall do an assessment of the work activities to determine what PPE is required.

The required PPE and training about its use, is to be provided and paid for by the business. This is the
last line of defense used by the worker.

a. Respirators (N95 or better) are not available and are being prioritized for health care and laboratories, emergency response, mortuary services and food supply.

b. Face shields are designed to put a physical barrier between workers. They are typically clear and cover the face of the worker. These are currently in limited supply.

c. Frequent handwashing is more effective than gloves. Disposable gloves are used by workers for handling items that may have contact from an outside vendor, money, parts and food safety, and when conducting cleaning and disinfecting activities. Gloves will carry COVID-19, just like workersʼ hands; therefore, require workers to wash their hands frequently with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and allow them the time to do so. This includes: when they arrive and depart from work; before and after they use the restroom; before eating, drinking or using tobacco; when they leave their workstation; and after handling money. Some areas may have hand-sanitizer dispensers that can be used for hand hygiene in place of soap and water, as long as hands are not visibly soiled. Sanitizer must contain at least 60% alcohol.

d. Homemade cloth masks or surgical masks are considered a source control that keeps germs the wearer expels when coughing or sneezing from landing on others. These do not provide the wearer any type of added protection; these only protect the workers around the source person.

Other protective measures

All workers, regardless of the type of work they are doing, must:
• practice good and frequent hand hygiene;
• follow social-distancing guidelines;
• follow good cough and sneeze etiquette;
• avoid touching their eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands; and
• avoid close contact with people who are sick.

Resources
Resources are available on the Minnesota Department of Labor and Industryʼs “Updates related to COVID-19” the webpage at www.dli.mn.gov/updates.

Get help
Request a free safety and health consultation at www.dli.mn.gov/about-department/our-areas-
service/minnesota-osha-workplace-safety-consultation or by calling 651-284-5060 or 800-657-3776.

Lodging Establishment Cleaning Guidance for COVID-19

U P D A T ED 4 /15 /2 0

Proper cleaning and disinfection of lodging rooms at hotels, motels, and similar facilities is critical to prevent the spread of COVID-19. This document provides guidance for operators of lodging facilities that are open for regular business, as well as those that are being used as temporary housing for people who have been infected with or exposed to COVID-19.

Cleaning lodging rooms to prevent the spread of COVID-19

When cleaning lodging rooms that are open for regular business, and are not being used to house individuals people under isolation or quarantine due to COVID-19, follow the guidelines below.

Personal hygiene and personal protective equipment (PPE)

Wash hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds. Always wash immediately after removing gloves.

Housekeeping staff should wear disposable gloves for all tasks in the cleaning process.

Additional PPE might be required, based on the cleaning and disinfectant products being used, and whether there is a risk of splash.

Cleaning items with nonporous surfaces

Clean nonporous surfaces using soap and water. Pay special attention to frequently touched surfaces such as tables, doorknobs, light switches, remote controls, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, sinks, etc.

Next, disinfect the area or item using a bleach solution or an EPA-registered disinfectant. When using these disinfectants, follow the manufacturer’s instructions for application and ensure the surface stays wet for the recommended contact time. Allow for proper ventilation during and after application.

A list of EPA-registered disinfectants can be found at:

List N: Disinfectants for Use Against SARS-CoV-2 (https://www.epa.gov/pesticide- registration/list-n-disinfectants-use-against-sars-cov-2)

Preparing a bleach solution for disinfection

Prepare a bleach solution by combining 5 tablespoons (1/3 cup) bleach per gallon of water or 4 teaspoons bleach per quart of water.

Never mix together any cleaning chemicals.

Cleaning items with soft surfaces

Clean soft surfaces such as carpet, rugs, drapes, etc., with soap and water or with cleaners appropriate for use on these surfaces. Launder items, if possible, according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Use the warmest appropriate water setting and dry items completely or disinfect with an EPA-registered disinfectant.

When cleaning laundry such as linens, blankets, towels, etc., remove the item carefully and do not shake. Launder items according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Use the warmest appropriate setting and dry items completely. Clean and disinfect any carts used to transport laundry.

Remove or replace difficult-to-clean items

Consider removing nonessential fabrics ahead of occupancy, such as accent pillows, extra upholstered furnishings, suitcase stand, wall decorations, and items beyond those necessary for client comfort.

Consider replacing hard-to-clean fabric items ahead of occupancy with similar items that allow for easier cleaning, such as large comforters, duvet covers, and coverlets.

Replace wood or fabric clothes hangers with disposable or cleanable hangers such as plastic or metal.

Preparing, cleaning, and disinfecting hotel rooms being used for COVID-19 quarantine

When preparing and cleaning lodging rooms that serve as temporary housing for people who have been infected with or exposed to COVID-19, follow the guidelines below.

Remove and replace difficult-to-clean items prior to guests’ arrival

Remove nonessential fabrics ahead of occupancy, such as accent pillows, extra upholstered furnishings, suitcase stands, wall decorations, and items beyond those necessary for comfort.

Replace hard-to-clean fabric items ahead of occupancy with similar items that allow for easier cleaning such as large comforters, duvet covers, and coverlets.

Replace wood or fabric clothes hangers with disposable or cleanable hangers such as plastic or metal.

Provide mattress covers and pillow covers that allow for proper cleaning and disinfection. Add plastic liners to all trash cans.

Personal hygiene and personal protective equipment (PPE)

Wash hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds. Always wash immediately after

removing gloves.

Housekeeping staff should wear disposable gloves and gowns for all tasks in the cleaning process, including handling trash.

Additional PPE might be required, based on the cleaning and disinfectant products being used, and whether there is a risk of splash.

Ensure employees are properly trained on the hazards of the cleaning chemicals used in the workplace.

For protection of housekeeping staff, wait to clean the room for at least 24 hours after guests depart. If 24 hours is not feasible, wait as long as possible. Open outside doors and windows to increase air circulation. If more than 7 days have passed since the quarantined guest has departed, additional cleaning and disinfecting is not necessary.

Cleaning items with nonporous surfaces

Clean nonporous surfaces using soap and water. Pay special attention to frequently touched surfaces such as tables, doorknobs, light switches, remote controls, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, sinks, etc.

Next, disinfect the area or item using a bleach solution or an EPA-registered disinfectant. When using these disinfectants, follow the manufacturer’s instructions for application and ensure the surface stays wet for the recommended contact time. Allow for proper ventilation during and after application.

A list of EPA-registered disinfectants can be found at:

List N: Disinfectants for Use Against SARS-CoV-2 (https://www.epa.gov/pesticide- registration/list-n-disinfectants-use-against-sars-cov-2)

Preparing a bleach solution for disinfection

Prepare a bleach solution by combining 5 tablespoons (1/3 cup) bleach per gallon of water or 4 teaspoons bleach per quart of water.

Never mix together any cleaning chemicals.

Cleaning items with soft surfaces

Clean soft surfaces such as carpet, rugs, drapes, etc., with soap and water or with cleaners appropriate for use on these surfaces. Launder items, if possible, according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Use the warmest appropriate water setting and dry items completely or disinfect with an EPA-registered disinfectant.

When cleaning laundry such as linens, blankets, towels, etc., remove the item carefully and do not shake. Launder items according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Use the warmest appropriate setting and dry items completely. Clean and disinfect any carts used to transport laundry.

Removing PPE

PPE must be properly removed to reduce the risk of self-contamination. Carefully remove gloves, gowns, aprons, etc., to avoid contaminating the wearer and the surrounding area. Remove gloves first, then wash hands using soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

Cleaning staff should immediately report breaches in PPE or any other potential exposures to their supervisor.

Best practices for additional cleaning for COVID-19

Use damp cloth cleaning methods. Dry dusting or sweeping can cause viruses to become airborne, likely resulting in further spread.

Dishes and utensils should be cleaned and sanitized between guests. Disposable eating utensils may also be offered.

Ceiling fan blades and windowsills should be cleaned.

Frequently change mop heads, rags, and similar items used for cleaning and disinfecting. Clean, disinfect, and air-dry cleaning equipment after each use.

Find additional information about COVID-19

For additional information about COVID-19 call the Minnesota Department of Health COVID-19 Hotline at 651-201-3920 or 1-800-657-3903 or visit:

Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) (www.health.state.mn.us/diseases/coronavirus/index.html) Coronavirus Disease in Minnesota (mn.gov/covid19/)

Interim Guidance for Businesses and Employers to Plan and Respond to Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) (www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/guidance-business- response.html)

Minnesota Department of Health
Food, Pools, and Lodging Services 625 Robert St N
St. Paul, MN 55164 651-201-5400

health.foodlodging@state.mn.us

Employer Preparedness Plan Requirements Checklist

Employers must develop and implement a plan that addresses the following components and post it publicly. 

If workers can work from home, they must be allowed to work from home. 

Make sure sick workers stay home

1. Establish health screening protocols for workers at the start of each shift, such as temperature taking or a health screening survey.

2. Identify and isolate workers with COVID-19 symptoms and those who have been exposed, and send them home.

3. Establish communication protocols when workers have been potentially exposed.

4. Establish worker sickness reporting protocols.

5. Evaluate and adjust sick leave policies to reflect the need for isolation and incentivize workers who are sick to stay home.

6. Provide accommodations for vulnerable populations. 7. Clearly communicate sick leave policies to all workers. 

Increase social distancing: Workers should be at least six feet away from each other 

  1. Maximize the use of telecommuting.
  2. Stagger shifts and breaks; create additional shifts.
  3. Evaluate traffic patterns to reduce crowding at entrances, in hallways, etc.
  4. Limit gatherings of workers.
  5. Ensure physical distancing in workplaces, including at workstations, production lines, etc.
  6. Limit non-essential worker interaction across floors, buildings, campuses, worksites, etc.
  7. Increase physical space between workers and customers, such as using a drive-thru or partitions. 

Worker hygiene and source control

1. Ensure workers regularly wash their hands. Ensure handwashing and/or hand-sanitizer facilities are readily available and stocked.

2. Provide recommended protective supplies, such as non-medical cloth masks, gloves, disinfectants, guards, shields, etc.

3. Post handwashing and “cover your cough” signs.

4. Encourage use of source control masks, such as non-medical cloth masks.

5. Prohibit on-site food preparation and sharing. 

Cleaning and disinfection protocols

1. Routinely clean and disinfect all areas, such as offices, bathrooms, common areas, shared electronic equipment, machinery, tools, controls, etc.

2. At least daily, clean all high touch items like doorknobs, handles, light switches, surfaces, etc.

3. Ensure availability of hand sanitizer and approved cleaning products.

4. Decontaminate the workplace if a worker becomes ill with COVID-19. 

All workers – management and employees – must be trained in these protocols.

Click here to print.

COVID-19 Preparedness Plan Template & Instructions

Baudette Disaster

Executive Order 20-40, issued by Gov. Tim Walz on April 23, 2020, requires each business in operation during
the peacetime emergency establish a “COVID-19 Preparedness Plan.”

A business’s COVID-19 Preparedness Plan shall establish and explain the necessary policies, practices and
conditions to meet the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Minnesota Department of Health
(MDH) guidelines for COVID-19 and federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards
related to worker exposure to COVID-19. The plan should have the strong commitment of management and be
developed and implemented with the participation of workers. The Minnesota Department of Labor and
Industry, in consultation with MDH, has the authority to determine whether a plan is adequate.

Your COVID-19 Preparedness Plan must include and describe how your business will implement at a minimum
the following:
1. infection prevention measures;
2. prompt identification and isolation of sick persons;
3. engineering and administrative controls for social distancing;
4. housekeeping, including cleaning, disinfecting and decontamination;
5. communications and training for managers and workers necessary to implement the plan; and
6. provision of management and supervision necessary to ensure effective ongoing implementation of
the plan.

This document includes a sample COVID-19 Preparedness Plan that meets the criteria listed above. No business
is required to use this model. If you choose to use this model, you must adapt it to fit the specific needs of your
business.

Click here to print a sample COVID-19 Template